Kauai Mini Golf Ceremony May 30th

Posted by on May 30, 2014

Tomorrow at noon there will be a ceremony to celebrate the unvieling of a new sign off the highway on Kauai Mini Golf land. Here is a county Press Release explaining the new program.

The sign signifies the Hawaiian Moku or region of KO’OLAU – HALELE’A. In a collaboration between private and public groups and the Mayors administration the  Mokupuni of Kauai are enjoying a re-introduction to our island society.  Community members are invited to bring  (conch shells) to blow as part of the ceremony.

Please see below for information regarding the ceremony protocol, locations of each Moku sign, and parking for the event.

Protocol for the Blessing Ceremony & Unveiling of Moku Signage:
12 noon: Blowing of  (conch shells) 6 (six) times (to represent the 6 moku of Kaua’i County) towards Mt. Wai’ale’ale;

  • Oli (chant) for Kaua’i, the Moku and/or Kaua’i’s ali’i;
  •  Speech offered by a Dignitary of the Community;
  •   Unveiling of the Moku sign;
  • Ho’okupu (offering) by the community;
  •  Blowing of  to end the ceremony

Date:               May 30, 2014, Friday
Time:              12 noon
KO’OLAU – HALELE’A

Location: Kaua’i Mini Golf Park also known as Aina Hou

Parking: Mauka (mountain) side of Kūhiō Highway. Please park at the Kaua’i Mini Golf Park and walk to the moku sign. All participants need to stay 10 ft. inland of Kūhiō Highway.

Ko’olau’s plant icon is the flower of the koko’olau (also known as ko’oko’olau). It is easy to see why this plant would be chosen for this moku by simply noticing it’s name, but koko’olau is a widely used medicinal plant. It is made into tea and has medicinal properties and is used in a variety of ways for healing. This is a very useful plant that through ingenuity hundreds of years ago became highly valued.Referred to as an i’a (fish) in Hawaiian, the ula, or spiny lobster, is highly prized as food. It’s delicate life and spawning cycle should remind us about the need for self control and proper management of natural resources around the island through lāhui, or temporary restriction periods.

The color is a cross between red (‘ula’ula, like the name of this fish) and purple, Kaua’i’s designated color since the late 1940s.

 

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